stem cell skin gun for burn victims !??

The possibilities of stem cell regenerative powers continue to grow at an accelerated pace. The latest case in point a technology developed by New York biotech RenovaCare company, now undergoing early safety trials pending future approval by the FDA. The idea is to take a second or third degree burned patient's stem cells and aerolized them using a device that looks like a "gun" in order to be sprayed over the injured area (once debrided) in order to heal skin faster and better than current standard methods. The"gun" in question is what they call The CellMist System, its about harvesting a patients stem cells from a small area of unwonuded skin (they say usually a squared inch) and from that sample harvest stem cells in order to be suspended in a fluid medium solution. The solution is then fed into what they call, well, The SkinGun. This device uses air to gently aerolized the solution and cells in it in order to create a mist that is sprayed over the exposed underlying conective tissues of a burned victim. The press release does not say weather these are mostly adipose derived stem cells or weather bone marrow aspirate material for harvesting would be as good or better. The fact is that is that the company says all of the subjects where this device has been used, all had good responses without any safety issues risen so far. The significant advantage of this new approach is that the results are free of the customary strictures following a conventional skin graft that frequently causes significant loss of function. Also, when traditional grafting is done for these type of second or third degree burns, esthetic wise the results are not optimal, usually resulting in significant scaring and or deformity. This new approach allows for a skin that in the end is almost identical to what it was before. The pictures speak a thousand words on this:

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Melvin A. Martinez-Castrillon, MD